How to make rose water: A face tonic + delicious drink

August 8, 2017
by HelloFresh Tips and Tricks
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    If the melodrama of literally eating flowers appeals to your romantic side, then you’re my kind of person. You should also find out how to make rose water right the heck now because it is way easier than you think and absolutely magical.

    To make this rose water that can be used a face toner and as a beautiful flavouring in drinks and sweets, you just need some roses, water, and a little bit of patience!

    Selecting blooms

    The first step for making beautiful rose water is to collect the petals of fragrant roses (it doesn’t matter if the petals are a bit bruised – smell is key), and for blooms that have been grown without pesticides. Home grown are the best option in this case, but if your green thumb is more of a black stub, you could also buy some organic roses from your local florist – ask them for yesterday’s flowers to save some money. Carefully remove the petals only for the rose water, and rise them to ensure no dirt or creepy crawlies remain. Discard the leaves and stems.

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    Get cooking

    In a thick bottomed pot, place your rose petals. Cover with just enough distilled water to submerge them fully (don’t overfill with water, or the rose water will be far too diluted). Simmer on a low heat until the petals have lost their colour and the water has taken it on. It’s a good idea to watch the pot so a very fierce boil doesn’t form.

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    Strain the water into a glass jar and keep in a cool place. Your rose water should last months (if you can manage not to use it all)!

    As a face toner, a little rose water applied to the skin with maintain your skin’s pH balance, which reduces oiliness. It’s also hydrating, antibacterial and slightly astringent, which means it will cleanse pores and reduce redness or blotchiness. Brilliant! And now you smell like a forest nymph!

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    1 comment

    mike says:

    your article is very good. I can’t wait to try it at home. Thank you for sharing the recipe with me. I’m waiting for your next article.

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